New Google And Apple Encryption Has Law Enforcement Scrambling

Business / Mobile / Tech

Apple and Google’s decision to include a high level of encryption into their latest mobile operating systems (iOS 8 and Android L) has law enforcement officials pulling out reasons why it needs to be reconsidered. Both operating systems will only be accessible to the user so Google and Apple can no longer access a users devices for law enforcement. Last week FBI director James Comey spoke out against the tech giants choice to protect its users data from all prying eyes including theirs. This week other officials have been weighing in with their takes on the matter.

“This is a very bad idea,” said Cathy Lanier, chief of the Washington Metropolitan Police Department, in an interview. Smartphone communication is “going to be the preferred method of the pedophile and the criminal. We are going to lose a lot of investigative opportunities.”

“What concerns me about this is companies marketing something expressly to allow people to place themselves beyond the law,” Comey said.

“It’s a significant issue for law enforcement,” Soiles said. “As long as we are doing it with court orders, there shouldn’t be any reason to keep us from it. We want to attack command-and-control structures of drug organizations, and to do that we have to be able to exploit their communication devices.”

There is certainly an argument for both sides in this matter and this is probably not the end of this situation. I’m sure law enforcement will take their case through the system to try and either reverse Google and Apple’s encryption move or find a way to break in to what they want to break into. Let’s see if Google and Apple stand their ground even if it goes to a higher court. What do you think of law enforcement’s arguments? Do you like Apple and Google’s new encryption keep the law out approach? Let us know in the comments below or on social media.

  Source: Bloomberg Businessweek

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