[Video] Blade: The First 3D Printed Supercar

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3D Printed Supercar

Loads of stuff has been made thanks to 3D printing including a gun that does fire bullets, a guitar, models for doctors and surgeons to examine. There’s plenty of more stuff as well, but that’s not what I’m here to talk about.

A company called Divergent Microfactories (U.S. based) has designed and manufactured the world’s first 3D printed supercar. Blade is capable of going from 0-60 mph in just over two seconds with its 700hp engine which can compress natural gas or petrol. Blade also weighs less than 90 percent of cars weighing 1,400lbs with a weight of only 61 pounds. Wow. It costs considerably less than other manufactures spend on vehicle manufacturing today. Showing more power-to-weight ratio than a Bugatti Veyron, this 3D printed car has some massive power behind the wheel.

The car was created with technology called “Node” which is a 3D printed aluminum joint that connects pieces of carbon fiber tubing to help make the vehicles chassis to include the engine, transmission, suspension, and driving shaft. Divergent Microfactories states that Node is very quick at printing and can make for a stronger, more durable chassis for the car thanks to being lightweight and also leads to less wear and tear while driving on the road.

“Society has made great strides in its awareness and adoption of cleaner and greener cars. The problem is that while these cars do now exist, the actual manufacturing of them is anything but environmentally friendly,” Kevin Czinger, CEO of Divergent Microfactories said. “At Divergent Microfactories, we’ve found a way to make automobiles that holds the promise of radically reducing the resource use and pollution generated by manufacturing.”

Blade, with a chassis consisting of 70 different nodes, only takes thirty minutes to be fully assembled.

The company is searching for investors to help them reach their $10 million budget. The funds will be used for setting up a factory where Divergent can finish making Blade. Once that is done, they will look for other developers to fund a mass production facility for Blade.

What are your thoughts on the world’s first 3D printed supercar? Leave a comment below, or on Google+, Facebook, or Twitter.

  Source: Science Recorder
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