Everyone Needs To Watch The Supermoon Eclipse September 27th


OK, I don’t care what you’re doing September 27th you need to take just a moment of your life to watch the night sky and witness the supermoon eclipse that’s going to happen. A supermoon eclipse has not happened in over three decades and it truly is going to be a spectacular event. Scientists say that the next supermoon eclipse won’t happen until 2033 so all the more reason to catch it this time around. NASA put together a great little video that will help you understand what a supermoon is, why it’s so special and why you should take a few minutes to check it out.

“Supermoons” occur because the moon’s orbit around Earth is elliptical rather than circular. While the moon’s average distance from our planet is about 239,000 miles (384,600 kilometers), the natural satelite roams as far away as 252,000 miles (405,600 km) at “apogee” and gets as close as 226,000 miles (363,700 km) at “perigee.”

A supermoon is a full moon that occurs at, or very near, perigee and appears abnormally big in the sky as a result. In fact, supermoons appear about 14 percent larger and 30 brighter than apogee full moons, which are also known as “minimoons.”

Supermoon eclipses are special; they’ve occurred just five times since 1900 (in 1910, 1928, 1946, 1964 and 1982), NASA officials said in the new video. “Normal” lunar eclipses are much more common. In fact, an observer at any particular location around the globe can expect to see a total lunar eclipse about once every 2.5 years on average.

Will you be watching the supermoon eclipse September 27th? Let us know in the comments below or on Google+, Facebook and Twitter.

  Source: Space.com
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