Baseball Riot Review: Take ‘Em Out In This Ragdoll Physics Based Puzzle Game

Game Reviews / Gaming / Reviews / Xbox

We’ve reviewed a couple other 10tons Xbox One games including Crimsonland and Sparkle Unleashed, and now the developer wants to hit another one out of the park. Our Baseball Riot review takes a look at the follow up to 2012’s Tennis In the Face, as 10tons brings another physics based game to the Xbox One, Windows 10, Windows Phone, iOS, Android, and Apple TV (sorry PS4/Vita players, however 10tons indicated that they aim to release Baseball Riot on PS4 and Vita in January 2016).


Baseball Riot is a physics based puzzle game and as such there isn’t too much of a story per se. The player, as the ex-baseball star Gabe Carpaccio, must travel through the US and clear more than 100 levels bristling with Explodz energy drink crazed villains as he tries to take down Explodz after they bought up his old baseball team. As you progress, you don’t get much in the way of story progression, just new and harder enemies to take out. Then again, who pays attention to stories in physics based puzzle games anyways?


Aside from the main character and introduction story, the game is barely about baseball and more about physics based puzzle fun with slapstick humor. Much like other games in the genre, simply line up your shot, swing your bat, and watch as the ball bounces off of walls and obstacles to take out fans, catchers, and umpires — amongst others — in ragdoll fashion. Each type of enemy you face has a different skill that you’ll have to overcome. Catchers for example will catch the ball while umpires can’t be knocked out from the front due to their protective padding. You’ll also face obstacles that will stop the ball dead, cause explosions, cause a flurry of additional balls, or otherwise hinder or help your cause.

You’ll start off in the first of 8 regions, each with 13 levels that you must pass by defeating all the enemies and obtaining stars. There are a maximum of three stars per level. Each region consists of a stadium which, when unlocked, basically tells you what the achievements for that region are. Some examples include getting five headshots in a single swing, destroying 10 pieces of glass during one level, and so forth. To get to the next region, you’ll have to get a minimum number of stars to proceed.

The gameplay is super simple: your shots do line up with a trajectory indicator to help you out, but it’s not as easy as it sounds. You’ll really have to put on your thinking cap and hope for a little bit of luck, especially to try and get some of the achievements. Fortunately if you take out 3 or more enemies in a single swing you’ll be rewarded with an extra ball to help you with your attempt to clear the level.


The graphics in Baseball Riot are pretty simple, but the cartoon style definitely fits the gameplay as you take out enemies and watch them flop around, fall, and take out other enemies if you time it just right. Due to the simplicity of the graphics, the game runs very smoothly and I didn’t encounter any hiccups or odd behaviour.


The graphics are simple but colourful, and work well for the game style.


The background level music is pretty upbeat and adds a bit of additional fun to the game. The sound effects are well done as well although that bouncing baseball can get a little annoying after extended sessions.


Overall Baseball Riot is a fun little time waster and at $4.99USD ($2.99USD on mobile devices), you should get your fun and money’s worth out of it. If you want to get a taste, there will also be a free trial on the Xbox One so you can try before you decide.

Baseball Riot
3.8 Out of 5
Nailed it
Challenging, fun ragdoll animations, plenty of levels to keep you occupied. Priced right.
Needs Work
Gets a bit repetitive at times.
Bottom Line
Overall Baseball Riot is a fun little time waster and at $4.99USD ($2.99 on mobile), you should get your fun and money's worth out of it. If you want to get a taste, there will also be a free trial on the Xbox One so you can try before you decide.
*We were sent a review copy of Baseball Riot for the purposes of this review.
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