Verizon Enterprise Hacked, Hackers Put Data Up For Sale

Security / Tech

Verizon enterprise solutions has been the victim of a pretty significant hacker attack in which the attackers have put the stolen data up for sale. The criminals have priced the stolen data at $100,000 for the entire lot or $10,000 per 100,000 records. The outfit also claims to have information regarding security vulnerabilities on Verizon’s website and is also offering those details for sale, no amount was given. KrebsOnSecurity contacted Verizon about the story and the company has acknowledged it and is taking steps to contact all affected customers.

“Verizon recently discovered and remediated a security vulnerability on our enterprise client portal,” the company said in an emailed statement. “Our investigation to date found an attacker obtained basic contact information on a number of our enterprise customers. No customer proprietary network information (CPNI) or other data was accessed or accessible.”

Verizon is no small bag of potatoes and the services they offer often go to Fortune 500 companies who are now potentially breached due to this incident. Companies like Apple use Verizon in their own retail stores for wireless service and more. With Apple already suffering from potential server tampering this situation isn’t exactly what they would have liked to hear.

We’ve been covering security and privacy a lot lately on Techaeris as the issue of companies struggling to keep up against cyber-criminals continues to grow. Stealing data is growing to become one of the biggest criminal activities in recent history. Hackers are pretty comfortable sitting behind their computer screens without ever having to physically threaten or physically hurt anyone. A simple string of code and a few keystrokes and they are in and out. The coverage we’ve been giving to security and privacy has just started, we are certain these cases will continue to grow in the coming years.

What do you think of Verizon Enterprise being hacked? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

  Source: KrebsOnSecurity
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