The First Ubuntu Tablet — The BQ Aquaris M10 — Is Here

Mobile / Tech

The first tablet running Ubuntu is finally here. Once again, Canonical, the organisation behind the development of Ubuntu, has tied up with BQ to produce the device.

The Ubuntu experience is now available on the BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition — the first commercial Ubuntu Tablet to come to market. It delivers the power to switch to an Ubuntu PC when connected with a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard, or when using the micro HDMI port to connect to an external monitor. The world’s first Ubuntu Tablet is available for pre-order worldwide, direct from the manufacturer, BQ.

Ubuntu was one of the original players in the hybrid space. It was the first OS to show off the ability to transform a mobile device into a full fledged personal computer, something that Microsoft is making a lot of noise about now with Windows 10. This, I suppose, highlights the difference between a humongous corporation with a lot of resources and a community.


BQ is not new to the Ubuntu scene — they made the very first mobile phone running Ubuntu Touch last year, the BQ Aquaris E4.5. That device was originally an Android phone which was repurposed to run Ubuntu Touch. Similarly, the BQ Aquaris M10 is also available with Android Lollipop as an option. The tablet is powered by a MediaTek Quad Core MT8163A processor with 2GB of RAM. It comes with 16GB of internal storage, though it also has a microSD card slot which allows you to amp up the storage by a further 64 GB. The tablet also has a 10.1-inch display, with the option of either a 1280px x 800px display or a full HD 1920px x 1080px display. It also has all the standard connectivity options such as WiFi and Bluetooth.

The full HD model is available now for €299.90 ($335.88) while the smaller resolution version is available for €259.90 ($291.08), and both come with a free cover and a screen protector.

What do you think of the BQ Aquaris M10? Will you be picking up a tablet running Ubuntu? Let us know in the comments below, or on Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: Ubuntu
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