New battery technology could charge in seconds and last for days

Android / iOS / Mobile / Science / Tech / Windows Phone
battery technology

Researchers at the University of Central Florida are working on a high-powered battery with supercapacitors that can be charged in seconds yet last a week.

Without a doubt, battery technology plays an important role in just about every piece of mobile technology we use today. From our smartphones to our headphones and beyond, there are batteries in almost everything. The battery technology we have today is certainly improved over the past several years but there’s always room for improvement. One only needs to look at the problems Samsung’s Note7 had to realize our battery technology isn’t perfect. Not only are the batteries we use today prone to combusting but their life span isn’t always ideal for many users.

Researchers at the University of Central Florida are working on a high-powered battery with supercapacitors that can be charged in a few seconds yet last a week. Now that’s battery technology most of could get behind.

Supercapacitors charge quickly because they store energy statically on the surface of the material whereas existing batteries use chemical reactions to store and discharge energy. The new battery is a small, thin piece of metal that could also be used in electric vehicles and wearables, such as smart watches. It can be charged more than 30,000 times, outlasting current lithium ion phone batteries, which have a lifespan of between 300 and 500 charges, Battery University in Canada says. The UCF researchers say that lithium-ion batteries typically will not last beyond 1500 charges.

“If they were to replace the batteries with these supercapacitors, you could charge your mobile phone in a few seconds and you wouldn’t need to charge it again for over a week,” Professor Nitin Choudhary, one of the researchers, told the Telegraph in London.

If this new technology is feasible, it could lead to slimmer smartphones, better-performing smartwatches and other applications beyond consumer uses. Researchers are still ironing out the bugs so this new technology isn’t ready for the market just yet but we hope it will be sooner than later.

What do you think of this research out of UCF? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

  Source: Sunday Morning Herald
Comments
To Top