Samsung Galaxy S8 release date said to be March 29th and this is what it looks like

Android / Mobile / Tech
Galaxy S8

The fingerprint sensor is now on the back of the phone as Samsung has removed their front home button, Apple is rumored to be ditching their home button as well.

The Samsung Galaxy S8 needs to be a hit for Samsung as they continue to recover from the Note7 battery problems. The company has taken extra care with the Samsung Galaxy S8 in terms of paying extra attention to quality control and safety. After the Note7 issues, Samsung has been under much scrutiny from both consumers and the media. The investigation into the Note7 battery fires concluded that Samsung had purchased faulty batteries from two different suppliers. We’re certain that the company is watching their suppliers much closer for the Galaxy S8.

Famous mobile phone leaker and now writer for VentureBeat, Evan Blass, has just published what looks like could be the Samsung Galaxy S8 in the flesh. Of course, as with most leaks, the photo isn’t the highest quality which leads many to believe that these leaks tend to be calculated PR releases to get the public buzzing and talking, which usually works.

The two models, with 5.8- and 6.2-inch QHD Super AMOLED screens that cover 83 percent of their front panels, were first detailed by The Guardian. Because of their unusual size, their aspect ratio — at 18.5:9 — deviates slightly from the industry-standard 16:9. As The Guardian noted, both models sport Samsung’s “edge” display, which curves downward on both sides of the handset.

The fingerprint sensor is now on the back of the phone as Samsung has removed their front home button, Apple is rumored to be ditching their home button as well. The new Galaxy S8 is expected to be announced on March 29th in New York City. This is a departure from Samsung’s normal Barcelona/Mobile World Congress release due to their going through quality control with a fine tooth comb.

What do you think of the leaked Galaxy S8 photo? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

  Source: VentureBeat
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