Chase eATM user has mobile app hacked and loses $3,000USD

Mobile / Security / Tech
Chase eATM

Chase eATM machines debuted over a year ago, replacing ATM machines like these.

Image Courtesy The Balance

Banking in the digital age is increasingly becoming much more challenging. One Chase eATM user has reported that their mobile app (used at select Chase eATM machines) was hacked which resulted in losing $3,000USD. The user found out he had been hacked when trying to login to his Chase mobile banking app and discovered he’d been locked out. He made the journey to a physical Chase bank location to inquire about his being locked out of his account. The branch informed him that someone had changed his address and password on his account and that’s why he was locked out. The local branch also informed him that his mobile app had been hacked when he used a Chase eATM machine.

At first, Chase told him someone had written a check on the account. Then Chase said someone had “hacked” (their word) his account through his Chase phone banking application and one of Chase’s new eATMs that don’t use ATM cards. The following day, my son filled out police reports in his city and the city where this occurred and indicated he would prosecute if the thief was apprehended. Chase immediately issued my son a conditional $3,000 credit while they investigated.

According to the user, the next day he tried to log in again to the mobile app and was once again locked out. Another visit to his local branch revealed another device had been trying to access his account and the account was locked out. The user eventually ironed things out with Chase, after some back and forth, and it appears reclaimed his $3,000USD. Interestingly, the user also claims that Chase told him his case wasn’t the only case involving a hacking of the Chase eATM mobile app. eATM banking is fairly new so it doesn’t surprise me that criminals are devising ways to get into the apps that drive it.

What do you think of this story? Do you use eATM banking? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

  Source: Cleveland.com
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