Microsoft and Google will make piracy sites harder to find in the U.K.

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piracy sites

The report only seems to indicate this will be enforced in the U.K., there is no indication Microsoft and Google will take the same actions with U.S.

Piracy sites and piracy site users beware, Microsoft and Google have pledged to make it even more difficult to find piracy sites through their search engines. The two major search engines (Google and Bing) have agreed to demote piracy sites in their search results in the U.K. under the “code of practice.” This means both search engines will move content that is known to be infringing on copyright off of the front page. Both companies made this agreement on a voluntary basis to help battle the increasing number of users seeking out content without paying for it.

“Consumers are increasingly heading online for music, films, e-books, and a wide variety of other content. It is essential that they are presented with links to legitimate websites and services, not provided with links to pirate sites,” Jo Johnson, U.K. minister of state for universities, science, research and innovation, said in a press release on Monday.

The BPI (British Phonographic Industry), which represents the U.K.’s recorded music industry, and the Motion Picture Association are also part of the agreement.

Both Google and Bing allow copyright owners to file DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) takedown requests for any material found published without permission. The DMCA process seems to work to a degree but new links always tend to appear elsewhere. This agreement is aiming to be another tool to at least limit the exposure these piracy sites get through search engines like Bing and Google.

The report only seems to indicate this will be enforced in the U.K., there is no indication Microsoft and Google will take the same actions with U.S. or other countries search results.

What do you think of these new anti-piracy measures being taken by Microsoft and Google? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

  Source: CNBC
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