Moshi launches USB-SL cables, to melt your face with speed

Tech

It seems like only yesterday that Moshi unveiled their new lineup of cases for the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+. Today they’re back with quite possibly the most important invention of our time: USB-SL cables. In this instance, SL stands for the Speed of Light, which is the fastest known speed in our universe. Moshi USB-SL cables harness the power of the speed of light* to literally blow you away. You may just fall down once you see how fast these cables perform.

Whether you need to charge your device, download all of your selfies, or even stream video, Moshi has got a USB-SL cable for you. The USB-C-based charging cable will charge your device to heretofore unknown levels. Your phone has a 3000mAh battery? Not anymore. Charging with this cable will give you an infinitymAh battery. You can download every cat video known to man with the USB-C Gigabit Ethernet Adapter. Gigabit in this instance should be replaced with “Insanobit” because the speed will truly be that insane. The HDMI adapter will let you watch any media in the known history of time. Past, present, future, the world will be your oyster.

All of these cables are pretty reasonably priced as well. The USB-C Charging cable (which may or may not actually include SL capabilities) is $34.95 USD for a 2 meter USB-C to USB-C cable. The Gigabit Ethernet adapter will set you back $39.95 USD, while the HDMI adapter is a mere $49.95. Your actual speeds may vary, especially considering USB-SL doesn’t actually exist, and is simply a clever ruse for your April Fool’s Day enjoyment. You can, however, pick up some quality Moshi cables to power your significantly-less-than-speed-of-light needs.

Hopefully the silly video above at least made you chuckle. You can always head over to Moshi’s site at the link below to grab your very own Speed of Light* USB peripherals. Do you want some SL cables of your very own? Tell us what you think in the comments below or on Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: Moshi
*Peripherals do not actually allow for speed of light data or power transfer.
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