NASA tells Gwyneth Paltrow that her Goop doesn’t contain NASA tech

Business / Tech
Gwyneth Paltrow

Goop healing stickers sell for $60USD for a pack of 10 and $120USD for a pack of 24. Now that’s a price that’s out of this world!

Marketing is the name of the game when you’re trying to sell a product. Gwyneth Paltrow knows the power of good marketing and the power it can have to build a brand. While marketing can be a very effective tool, it also should probably be based on facts. Goop is one of the companies Gwyneth Paltrow is involved in and their latest marketing campaign was called into question by NASA itself. Goop is a self-proclaimed “healing stickers” that is supposed to help what ails you, from depression to arthritis.

The marketing snafu that has thrust Gwyneth Paltrow and Goop into the tech and science spotlight is the claim that Goop contains NASA technology. That’s right, these “healing stickers” supposedly contained a conductive carbon material developed for NASA spacesuits. This conductive material was supposedly used by NASA to monitor the vital signs of its astronauts. The problem is, NASA doesn’t have a clue what Goop is talking about. The agency has said it doesn’t use carbon materials to line the suits and none of their suits have carbon fibers at all.

The Goop stickers are sold by a company called Body Vibes and both Goop and Body Vibes issued statements on the matter.

“The opinions expressed by the experts and companies we profile do not necessarily represent the views of [Goop],” the brand said. “Based on the statement from NASA, we’ve gone back to the company to inquire about the claim and removed the claim from our site until we get additional verification.”

“We have learned that our engineer was misinformed by a distributor about the material in question, which was purchased for its unique specifications,” the group said in a statement. “We regret not doing our due diligence before including the distributor’s information in the story of our product.”

Goop healing stickers sell for $60USD for a pack of 10 and $120USD for a pack of 24. Now that’s a price that’s out of this world! The company has fixed the error on its webpage and no longer claims it is using NASA technology.

What do you think of about Goop’s claims and NASA’s statement? Let us know in the comments below or on Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: FOX
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