Face ID accuracy may be reduced on the first batch of iPhone X

Apple / iOS / Mobile / Tech
Face ID accuracy

Hopefully, Apple will be able to roll out a software update that fixes the problem for early adopters.

At Apple’s keynote for the iPhone X the company touted Face ID accuracy calling it more secure than Touch ID. That remains to be seen. What we do know is that Apple has been having production issues due to Face ID components. This has led analysts to predict that Apple will only have 2-3 million iPhone X’s at launch. A new report from Bloomberg seems to be shedding some light on the production shortage.

In order to have some iPhones ready for launch, Apple has allowed suppliers to reduce Face ID accuracy so they could build the phones. This likely means if you’re lucky enough to get a first run iPhone X, it may not work as well as you’d hoped.

As Wall Street analysts and fan blogs watched for signs that the company would stumble, Apple came up with a solution: It quietly told suppliers they could reduce the accuracy of the face-recognition technology to make it easier to manufacture, according to people familiar with the situation.

According to Bloomberg, Apple has been working on Face ID for quite some time but it looks like not all of the bugs have been worked out.

“That technology is something we have been looking at for five years,” Chief Design Officer Jony Ive said in an onstage discussion hosted by The New Yorker this month. “We had prototypes that were this big,” he added, holding his hands about a foot apart. By the time Apple had greenlighted the iPhone X, the company was looking for technology that could be squeezed into a space a few centimeters across and millimeters deep.

What we do know is, Apple has reduced Face ID accuracy for this first batch and analysts believe the issue will be resolved by the first half of 2018. Hopefully, Apple will be able to roll out a software update that fixes the problem for early adopters. Only time will tell. Be sure to hit the source link and read Bloomberg’s in-depth coverage.

What do you think of Apple’s move? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below, or on Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: Bloomberg
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