New Qualcomm chip could triple battery life in wireless headphones

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Qualcomm has stated that it’s working with major wireless manufacturers to put the chip in future wireless headphones.

A boast by SoC maker Qualcomm may have users rethink the idea of buying wireless headphones: a new Qualcomm chip could triple battery life in wireless headphones. Not only that, but the new chip could help silly Bluetooth annoyances associated with wireless headphones.

As Anthony Murray (Senior Vice President and General Manager of Qualcomm’s Voice & Music business unit) said, the new QCC5100 is a low power Bluetooth SoC and it reduces power consumption by a whopping 65 percent. That could give wireless headphones up to three times more playback time compared to current offerings. Not only that, but the new chip supports Bluetooth 5. The new standard is slowly making its way into current devices, with the S8 and iPhone X sporting it. The chip is also capable of reduced disconnects in crowded spaces, thanks to better power transmitting Murray also said. The SoC will also double the processing power of Qualcomm’s current wireless headphone chips.

This means that thanks to the chip’s capabilities, hearing assistance, active noise cancellation, and the possibility of conditional sound changes are doable. An example given was for someone listening to tunes in a subway or train station. The headphones could lower the volume while an announcement overhead is playing.

Qualcomm has stated that it’s working with major wireless manufacturers to put the chip in future wireless headphones, although those manufacturers have yet to publicly state that they’re using the QCC5100. Qualcomm’s current chip powered some of the bigger wireless headphone sets in 2017. With that being said, it’s a good possibility that 2018’s offerings will house the new Qualcomm chip.

Do you currently have a pair of wireless headphones that you use? Do the ideas of longer battery life and better transmission power excite you? Let us know by leaving your comments down below, or on Google+Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: Gizmodo
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