Could Google add game streaming to their long list of services?

Android Gaming / Gaming / Google / Tech
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It’s rumored that Google has been working on something in the gaming ecosystem for the past two years.

If there’s one big massive company to be able to start their own game streaming service from the ground up, it would definitely be Google. Now, that’s not to say that Google is going to be breaking down doors with their own brand new gaming console to try and out beat the big players out there such as Nintendo, PlayStation, and Xbox. However, it’s rumored that Google has been working on something in the gaming ecosystem for the past two years.

What Google is reportedly trying to do is develop a game streaming service that will be able to stream software to a Chromecast device, or a future, non-existent console according to a report from The Information. Codename “Yeti” could possibly be similar to how PlayStation has their own Playstation Now service or Nvidia’s GeForce Now service letting you stream games on demand. Yeti is being developed by two Google hardware execs, Mario Queiroz, VP of product management, and Majd Bakar, VP of engineering, so it’s likely there may be a console of some sort.

If this does end up happening and Google is starting out by testing this streaming service with Chromecast, it’ll be easy since you can already cast some mobile games on a bigger screen. The only let down is how a controller would work if developers or Google plan on letting people stream games from the cloud. One’s mobile device could work out just as well too, but a controller could be much easier to use while playing.

With Google hiring Phil Harrison, a man who has worked on both the Xbox and PlayStation team and has 15 years of gaming under his belt, there’s a good chance Google could come out with something sooner or later and kick off their own game service.

If Google does come out with their own subscription game streaming service, would you join? Let us know by leaving your comments down below, or on Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: The Verge
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