Google Pixel and Pixel XL aren’t quick charging thanks to Android Pie

Android / Google / Mobile / Tech
Pixel XL

Google is verifying a fix for non-PD USB-C chargers and will roll it out in the coming weeks.

It’s a sad day when you’re quick charging phone doesn’t quick charge anymore thanks to a brand new OS update. Currently, the Pixel and Pixel XL phones from Google are having issues when it comes to quick charging from non-PD (Power Delivery) USB-C chargers due to a bug in Android Pie. Note, this only affects the original Google Pixel devices and not the Pixel 2 devices.

Even back in the beta phase for Android Pie, this was an issue and Google never really fixed it. All the company did was to report back to the bug saying “Status: Won’t Fix (Infeasible)” — basically this means Google was unable to fix the issue at hand. A report has opened back up with the full release of Android Pie, more people are speaking up saying they are experiencing this problem. Google has already commented back to Ars Technica about the issue and gave this response.

We’re aware of an issue where non-Power Delivery (PD) USB-C chargers no longer rapidly charge the 2016 Pixel and Pixel XL after the upgrade to Android 9 Pie. The 18W rapid charger included in-box is a PD charger and does not exhibit this behavior. We are verifying a fix for non-PD USB-C chargers and will roll it out in the coming weeks.

This does explain a lot as to why my Pixel XL hasn’t been quick charging to its full extent. Even with Google saying to use the 18W charger that comes with the device, my phone still doesn’t charge as fast as it should. Others might be in the same boat as well but until Google really gets this fixed, all we can do is wait. If you haven’t updated to Android Pie yet, keep holding off until the update is pushed out. Same goes for those, like me, who already have the latest OS on their Pixel device.

What do you guys think about the 2016 Pixel/Pixel XL smartphones not quick charging with non-PD chargers? Has your Pixel device been affected? Let us know in the comments below or on Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: Ars Technica
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