Verizon to enable RCS texting in early 2019

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Verizon

The idea of RCS first debuted in 2007 and telecommunication companies are very slowly starting to implement the process.

The idea of RCS first debuted in 2007 and telecommunication companies are very slowly starting to implement the process. Since Google jumped on board back in 2015, more companies have been following suit as well. During a small business messaging event, Verizon Wireless has made the announcement that it will start supporting the new standard.

In an event in New Jersey last week, Big Red made mention that users will start see the protocol being supported in “early 2019.” That’s a wide gap when it comes to a launch date, though. It’s also unclear whether the mobile carrier — that’s starting to ramp up its 5G deployment — will support the Universal Profile 1.0. 

For those who don’t know, RCS stands for Rich Communication Services. It’s a protocol set to replace SMS as the standard for sending and receiving messages. Like iMessage for Apple users, RCS is set to bring some modern features to messaging. 

RCS will allow users to send and receive videos, pictures, and more rich media within a messaging app more fluidly than the MMS/SMS standard now. It’ll also have support for read receipts, have typing indicators, and do away with the 160-character limit. Even so, the protocol will be unencrypted, just like SMS and MMS messages are today, and unlike iMessage, Whatsapp, or other similar apps. 

Verizon will finally join other major US carriers in implementing the process. Currently, T-Mobile, US Cellular, and Sprint support the protocol. AT&T is in the process of updating to the Universal Profile, but when it’ll debut is still unclear. It is nice to finally see that carriers are starting to get on board with the new protocol, though.

Are you looking forward to RCS being implemented on Verizon? Are you using something other than SMS to reach out to people? Let us know in the comments below or on Google+Twitter, or Facebook.

  Source: Engadget

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