Infographic: Why you should repair your broken smartphone

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Since the early 1970s, cell phones have been the fastest growing technology phenomenon ever.

We use our cell phones for everything, sometimes to the point that we forget they are actually phones we can use for sending and receiving phone calls. When we need to look for a job, work on our resumes, or communicate with our employers, a smartphone can be a lifeline. It’s almost impossible to get a job without one, so it makes sense that most people don’t want to be without one for long.

This is especially true when they break — we’d almost always rather get a new smartphone than repair a damaged one because we are afraid it will take too long to get it fixed. Unfortunately, this means that in the United States alone we are throwing away 350,000 cell phones DAILY. The real kicker? Oftentimes smartphone repairs can be done while you wait, eliminating the need for costly replacements.

Since the early 1970s, cell phones have been the fastest growing technology phenomenon ever. There are now more phones in the world than there are people, and some countries boast more than two cell phones per person! In the United States, 95% of adults aged 18-29 have a smartphone, and 20% of them rely on it as their sole connection to the internet. Most people keep their phones an average of 2.9 years — unless something happens.

The most common forms of damage to smartphones are cracked screens — 29% — and scratched screens — 27% — while batter malfunctions come in a close third at 22%. These are all very easily fixable forms of damage to phones that can often be fixed by a qualified repair shop in a matter of minutes while you wait. So why do people prefer to shell out for a brand new $1100 phone instead of driving to the repair shop and waiting five minutes?

Learn more about the psychology of getting broken phones fixed from the infographic below.

smartphone

What do you think of this infographic? Have you ever had your smartphone repaired? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, or Facebook. You can also comment on our MeWe page by joining the MeWe social network.

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