The new Dodge Charger Pursuit police car will come with ambush sensors

Auto / Tech
Dodge Charger Pursuit

I guess this means no more banana’s in the tailpipe.

Image Courtesy Auto Evolution

These days most of the police cars you see on the road are made by Ford. Ford’s Explorer model has become a prime choice for many agencies around the country but that could change with the Dodge Charger Pursuit. Dodge teamed up with InterMotive to modify the Dodge Charger Pursuit backup sensors and camera to sense if someone is approaching the vehicle from behind. Essentially what they’ve built are ambush sensors to prevent criminals from trying to get the drop on unsuspecting police officers. I guess this means no more bananas in the tailpipe.

“This technology is designed to prevent an officer from being ambushed from the rear while parked,” Jeff Kommor, Fiat Chrysler vice president of fleet sales, said in a press release. “While it does not replace vigilance, this technology acts as a second set of eyes and provides police officers with added peace of mind when they are in a parked Charger Pursuit.”

InterMotive said that the demand for this equipment rose in response to “tragic ambushes of police officers over the last year.”

If, and when, someone is detected approaching the vehicle from behind, the ambush sensors will activate rear lights, lock all the doors, close the front windows if open and display a video feed to the police officer from the camera. The good news for law enforcement agencies is that all Dodge Charger Pursuit police cars will come standard with the new technology so no need for pricey add-on packages. I do question the real possibility of false positives with this technology in areas where foot traffic is high, especially large cities. Perhaps the system can be turned on and off to prevent the system from alarming in areas where people are most likely going to be casually walking behind a police car.

What do you think of this new police tech? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

  Source: CNBC
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