Man sues Uber for €45 million after wife discovers affair through Uber notifications

iOS / Mobile / Tech
uber notifications

Upon finding out this information, the wife filed for divorce and this is why this Frenchmen is suing Uber.

Uber notifications can be very helpful when you’re using the service to get from one place to another. Usually, notifications for any app are an opt-in feature and even if you do opt-in, once you log out of the app, notifications generally stop. Not so for one Frenchmen who happened to schedule some Uber rides using his wife’s cellphone. The problem — which has prompted this same man to sue Uber for €45 million — is that Uber notifications continued to be sent to her cell phone even after he had logged out of his account on her phone.

Those Uber notifications led to the wife figuring out that these Uber rides her husband was taking were to meet up with another woman. Upon finding out this information, the wife filed for divorce and this is why this Frenchmen is suing Uber. The issue of notifications being sent from the Uber app, even after logging out is said to be an iOS problem as the issue was recreated.

The fault is not limited to an individual case. Le Figaro succeeded in reproducing the experience described by the complainant. A first iPhone, connected and then disconnected to an Uber account, always receives the same notifications as a second iPhone, on which is launched a command. In this scenario, it is thus possible to know remotely when a user uses the services of private drivers and to obtain the information relating to his support in real time, without even needing his password. This does not, however, provide access to more accurate data, such as real-time geolocation or exact destination. When you open the notification, only the login screen appears. *Translated from French

Uber has declined to comment on the lawsuit saying, “Uber does not publicly comment on individual cases, and especially on cases that involve a divorcing couple.”

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  Source: The Verge  Source: LeFigaro
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