German regulators want Tesla to stop using the term autopilot in ads

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“We have always been clear with our customers that Autopilot is a driver’s assistance system that requires the driver to pay attention at all times.”

The Tesla Autopilot system has been getting a bit of attention in the spotlight lately and not in a way the company likes. After some incidents involving Tesla’s Autopilot system, the safety of that system has come into question from regulators. German regulators are asking Tesla to stop using the term autopilot in their advertisements because it could confuse and give the wrong expectations to buyers. Tesla has been pretty upfront about the system and is well documented in letting potential buyers know that the system is not a self-driving feature.

Transport regulator KBA has written to the company, telling it: “In order to prevent misunderstandings and false expectations from clients, we are asking that the misleading term ‘Autopilot’ no longer be used in advertisements for the system.”

Still, some drivers have tested the system’s limits despite Tesla’s clear warning that Autopilot is a driver assist feature and drivers must remain alert with hands on the wheel. One YouTube video went viral after motorists discovered one man taking advantage of the feature to grab some sleep behind the wheel.

Meanwhile back in Germany, there has been an ongoing investigation since last October looking into Tesla accidents and whether or not Autopilot was to blame.

Last week, a Tesla spokesman told AFP: “We have always been clear with our customers that Autopilot is a driver’s assistance system that requires the driver to pay attention at all times.”

While Tesla has done its due diligence in presenting the feature to buyers correctly and with proper warnings, you will always have some who insist on testing the waters. Perhaps the German regulators are on to something and Tesla might consider re-branding the feature so as not to create confusion about the product and to better protect their own interests.

What do you think about the request by German regulators? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

  Source: Yahoo
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