Disney researchers demo new ubiquitous wireless power transfer system

Science / Tech
wireless power

Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer is Disney’s wireless power experiment.

Wireless power — truly wireless power  — is something we’ve been dreaming of for a long time. There’s been research and studies going on for years and it looks like Disney may have stumbled on a possible solution. They call it “Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer,” which is quite the mouthful. Rather than try and explain what the Disney time is doing with their wireless power research, just watch the two videos below to get a better idea of what they’re up to.

Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

The tech is pretty cool, and while I’m sure there are probably still hurdles to overcome, it’s an interesting step in the direction of true wireless charging and power for devices. Of course, there’s always the biggest question and hurdle — the cost — but they can address that once they know if the tech is even totally viable. Hit the link below to check out Disney’s blog post and documentation on the entire project.

What do you think of Disney’s research in this field? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

  Source: Disney
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