Disney Infinity 2.0 Edition: Loki Overview

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Live out your Asgardian super villain fantasy with Disney Infinity 2.0 Edition and their newly-released Loki figure. Made available alongside popular Avengers member Falcon yesterday, Loki comes equipped with his iconic Scepter, ready to put New York City in a deep freeze. Sort of.
As with the other villains released in Disney Infinity 2.0 Edition, the fact that Loki is in The Avengers storyline doesn’t make a lick of sense. You’ll frequently be fighting Loki’s minions, and even Loki himself, as Loki himself. It makes some awkward and funny story moments, but the story still plays out the exact same way.
Loki’s character is voiced by the legendary Troy Baker (seriously, just Google him, you’ve heard his voice in a video game I guarantee it), and his animations do a perfect job getting across his devious nature. It’s worth noting that he’s essentially the same Loki you fight during The Avengers playset, complete with phasing ability and ever-annoying ranged attacks.

In direct contrast to Falcon, Loki is all about ranged combat. He has a melee attack of course, but it is nothing but extremely light hits with his Scepter. At the end of his three hit combo he has a 2-3 second pause where you can’t hit again or move as he poses with his weapon. The only thing you can do at this point is shoot a ranged attack, which is clearly the way he is meant to be played. Such range attacks are concentrated balls of ice that can also be charged up for a much stronger attack with a satisfying knockback effect.
Loki starts the game unable to fly, equipped with only a basic double jump, but you can unlock the ability to float using the power of Scepter late in his skill tree. The rest of Loki’s skill tree is based around getting quicker and harder-hitting ranged attacks, and utilizing his trickster special move.
Sticking with his trickster nature, Loki’s RB or special attack creates a doppelganger that will attract enemy attacks and explode after a set time. I had quite a bit of trouble getting this to work effectively in its first stages. The real Loki goes invisible while his impostor is out, but even then enemies would still frequently chase me down, and Loki’s stronger ranged attacks knock enemies back so I constantly had to wrangle them back into the explosion radius at the last second. It certainly works flavor-wise for Loki, but it’s not a very effective special move; at the very least it’s not the emergency switch that it is for some other characters.

One interesting twist of Loki’s special is that later on in the skill tree you can unlock the ability to have the his impostor attack enemies alongside you. So, instead of just sitting around taking hits, he runs around actively engaging enemies and holds aggro better – let alone the fact that he is in better range when he finally does explode.
The physical Loki figure is nice and right on par with the rest of the Disney Infinity set. As you’d expect, he appears very similar to Thor, with the flowing cape and all, but much thinner and hunched over in his typical villainous stance. One nice detail is that his helmet isn’t just part of his face. The ear guards are both flaps that hover over his face as it were a real helmet. His cape is the same slightly pliable material as Thor’s is, and comes to two sharp points at the end. My figure came with a little bit of what looks like yellow paint on his otherwise black pant-covered thigh, but it it’s hard to tell if it somehow got painted incorrectly or if the paint rubbed off from another piece. Either way, it’s not very noticeable.

As with Falcon, Loki was made available yesterday and can be had for a limited time at the special price of $10.99 (whereas Falcon is $9.99), until his price goes back to the normal $13.99.
Buy Disney Infinity 2.0 Edition Loki on Amazon
***We were sent a Loki figure by Disney for the purposes of this overview.

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